Items

Forums
BLM Blocks Media From Horrific Experiment on 200 Horses
 By Saferaphus   •   3rd Sep 2016   •   1,184 views   •   4 comments


The Cloud Foundation and American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign, along with veterinarians and congressmen agree that spaying is a poor option for controlling the number of free roaming Mustangs in the American West. They very much object to the Bureau of Land Management for proposing that it is. And, say these individuals and organizations, the BLM is ignoring the First Amendment Rights of citizens by forbidding access of the public and press to what are being called horrific experiments.

The proposed experiment in wild horse population control includes the use of a procedure called ovariectomy. Iíve described briefly what this procedure is in Should You Spay Your Mare From Breeding. While not repeating details here, it is a risky, invasive surgery that is only performed on our domestic horses when there is a problem with the horseís ovaries. It is rarely done as a means to prevent unwanted foals. Itís not a complicated surgery, but it does present a danger to the mare if the horse is not cared for properly after the procedure. This is why the many people believe it is a very poor way of approaching population management.

Following an ovariectomy, mares need time to heal. They must be prevented from lying down for a day or two after. Because the procedure is done internally, there is no way to tell if an infection is setting in without close monitoring. In a stable, a mare may be tied for a period following the procedure. But in the wild, it would be impossible to immobilize mares safely. Ultimately, the BLM will not be doing the operation on one, two or even half a dozen mares. Mass sterilization may include dozens of horses. Other dangers that require monitoring to remediate is the possibility of internal bleeding and the escape of intestine through the surgical incision. Our own horses will certainly get pain relief and antibiotics. But, this may not happen with wild horses.

At any given time on the range, a mare could be in foal. Itís estimated that up to 75% of the mares subject to the ovariectomy may be in foal at the time of the procedure. Many will lose their foals as a result.

Not only could this procedure damage or endanger a horse physically, but mentally as well. Ovaries produce hormones, and their removal will affect the mare's behavior. This, say advocates, fundamentally changes the wild behavior of horses on the range.

In mid-August wild horse advocates launched a lawsuit against the BLM, citing that First Amendment rights will be infringed upon as the government department plans to deny media and public access while conducting their experiments on two hundred horses in Oregon. Part of the justification for the experiments was to test the social acceptability of the procedure.

The BLM has tried many different methods of population control, and all have met with some resistance from wild horse rights advocates. With so many that are socially unacceptable, impractical, or ineffective you almost canít blame them for experimenting with a different method. But given the risks involved to the horses, and the potential for backlash from the advocacy community, you really have to wonder if this was the best they could come up with.
Horse News More PB Articles About:  BLM,
Horse News More In This Category:  General      Horse News More From This Author:  Saferaphus
Valkyrie  MOD 
Why wouldn't they just geld stallions instead??? Seems less invasive and less risky, as well as less time consuming. You could round up entire bachelor bands and in one fell swoop severely limit the breed's capabilities to expand.
  Sep 3, 2016  •  1,184 views
 
Saferaphus  
Good question. Could it be too simple?
  Sep 8, 2016  •  1,152 views
 
Saferaphus  
The BLM has cancelled the plans to try this controversial method.
  Sep 10, 2016  •  1,137 views
 
Valkyrie  MOD 
Great news.
  Sep 15, 2016  •  1,114 views
 More News by Saferaphus
What is in Your Horse Feed
15th Aug 2018   |   General   |   Saferaphus
When you buy a bag of textured or pelleted horse feed, none of the ingredients are easily recognizable. A bag of oats contains oats - and thatís easy to see. But often even the label on a bag of feed doesnít list the exact ingredi ...
Buy or Adopt A Horse
10th Aug 2018   |   General   |   Saferaphus
A popular slogan amongst pet rescue groups is adopt, donít shop. As someone who has adopted several dogs, and is currently working to rehabilitate a badly abused puppy mill survivor, Iím inclined to agree with the sentiment. But w ...
What To Do With A Donkey
7th Aug 2018   |   General   |   Saferaphus
The BLM is rounding up about sixty burros in the Bullhead City of Arizona area and shortly, these burros, or donkeys as many of us call them, will be up for adoption. But, who would want a donkey? Turns out, donkeys are not only c ...
Horse Photo Contest
3rd Aug 2018   |   General   |   Saferaphus
Did you just take the perfect picture of your horse? While youíre probably inclined to share it on Instagram, or on your Facebook feed, you might consider entering it in a contest instead. There are many horse photo contests onlin ...
Equine Sedation
2nd Aug 2018   |   General   |   Saferaphus
One aspect of the pregnancy check I watched a vet perform recently that really bothers me is the sedation. I hate seeing horses sedated. There is some internal fear that creeps in on me when I see a horse standing with its head dr ...
Is One Helmet Really Better Than Another
31st Jul 2018   |   General   |   Saferaphus
Chances are, if you are out shopping for a helmet, you may assume that the more money you spend, the more protection you will be getting. But, according to an independent test done by a Swedish insurance company, that might not be ...
How Much Will Your Horse Cost You in 2018
30th Jul 2018   |   General   |   Saferaphus
About four years ago, I wrote an article about how much it costs to keep a horse. Prices rarely drop, so what can we expect to pay to keep a horse over the next year. Hereís a look at some basic costs. ...
How to Lead a Horse
27th Jul 2018   |   General   |   Saferaphus
Leading isnít walking ahead of your horse while pulling on the lead rope. It isnít tagging along as your horse drags you along. Rather, your horse should be trained to walk beside you with no tension on the rope at all. You may mo ...
  View All News by Saferaphus
 
©2002 - 2018   PonyBox LLC Create Account Terms & Conditions Privacy Contact Us
333 Members Online 240,091 Registered Members 2,463 News Articles 10,172,777 Unique News Article Views 222,314,410 Website Views