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Cupboard to Stable Hacks
 By Saferaphus   •   1st May 2017   •   1,253 views   •   0 comments
Cupboard to Stable Hacks

Vinegar
Vinegar is inexpensive and can be used for cleaning lots of different things. Avoid using soap on bits and scrub with vinegar instead. The vinegar rinses off easily leaving no yucky flavor. You can use it to clean most metal fittings and mixed with salt it cleans up brass and copper nicely. It can be corrosive, so it’s best to rinse or wipe whatever you’ve cleaned with vinegar well.

Because it is a disinfectant, vinegar can be used to clean pails, troughs and other surfaces in your stable. Horticultural vinegar is much stronger than the stuff we normally buy at the grocery store and can be sprayed on noxious weeds to kill them. It’s a relatively environmentally friendly herbicide. This stuff can irritate skin, so it’s best to wait until a rain washes it away before letting your horse go near.

Some people believe putting vinegar, specifically cider vinegar, in horse’s feed or water helps repel bugs. Some believe it has other health benefits too. It can be used in rinse water on tails and manes. It could irritate skin, but some people use it on rain rot and scratches. Malt vinegar can be used on the outside of your horse, but not on the inside.

Baking Soda
A gentle scrub for your metal fittings can be made with a bit of soap and some baking soda mixed into a paste. Any surface that needs scrubbing can be cleaned with baking soda. It’s also a deodorizer, so it helps de-stink stalls, trailers and other places where manure smells might build up. Some people feed it to their horses to prevent acid build-up that could lead to ulcers, but there is no evidence that this is effective. Baking soda is neutralized by the horse’s powerful stomach acid, so what you end up with are water and gas - and you might not want your horse to have a stomach full of gas.

Salt
Like baking soda, salt can be used as a cleaner. Soak brass or copper fixtures with a mixture of salt and vinegar to remove the tarnish. Salt water is a good way to bathe wounds and prevent infection. Saline solution can be used to bathe irritated eyes and skin.

Cornstarch
Whiten those whites with cornstarch. Rubbing cornstarch into your horse’s white stockings makes them look brilliant white. Cornstarch mixed with cornmeal can be used as a dry shampoo. Rub it into your horse’s coat and then brush or vacuum it out. A mild paste to soothe sunburned noses can be made by mixing a bit of water with cornstarch. You probably shouldn’t feed cornstarch to your horse.

Herbs and Spices
There are lots of herbs and spices in your kitchen cupboard that can be used on your horse and in your stable. Turmeric, cinnamon, and ginger are just a few of the spices commonly fed to horses. Some people swear that feeding their chestnut or bay horse paprika enhances its coat color. Herbs like chamomile, fenugreek, and valerian are often used for horses.

Tabasco
If you want a horse to leave a fence rail, stall wall or other structure un-chewed, a paste of Tabasco and petroleum jelly painted on the surface will probably work. Any hot sauce or mixture of hot spice mixed with an oil base can be used to paint a surface and prevent cribbing or chewing.

Sugar
We all like a sweet treat. Sugar cubes are a classic tidbit to reward your horse with. You can easily make pony cookies by mixing syrup or molasses with grain. Just don’t feed too much of any sugary food.

Oils
Corn, sunflower, soy and other vegetable oils can be fed to horses to help them gain weight and condition. Don’t use olive, peanut or other oils on your leather gear though. It won’t do a good job of conditioning them and might make them more tasty to rodents.

Tea
Rooibos, green and black tea can be given to horses. Rooibos and black tea can be used to soothe skin conditions. Green and white tea is supposed to help the liver and some people believe that teas can help defend against cancer. Instead of putting leftover tea and tea leaves in your composter, they can go into your horse’s feed.

We like kombucha and make our own. Kombucha is a fermented drink made with black tea and sugar. The liquid forms a thick biofilm called a SCOBY on top. The SCOBY is supposed to be filled with lots of good microflora. You can give either the tea or the SCOBY to your horse.

Tea shouldn't be given in great quantity. It does contain some caffeine, and that could affect your horse.

Lecithin
I make a mixture of about a tablespoon of liquid soy lecithin with a cup of olive oil to make a non-stick coating for baking pans. A thin coating prevents foods from sticking. The granules area also used in bread baking. Lecithin granules fed to your horse may prevent stomach ulcers. There is also some anecdotal evidence that it may help calm a horse with a nervous disposition.
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