Items

Forums
Equine Sickness by the Season
 By Saferaphus   •   20th Jun 2017   •   347 views   •   0 comments
Each season brings with it a change in how we look after our horses. And each season brings with it problems we must watch for, and things we can let our guard down about. No sense in worrying about Lyme Disease in January when the snow covers the grass, but winter means we might have to watch for lice and impaction colic. Hereís a look at horse diseases and health concerns throughout the seasons.



Spring
Spring grass can be a problem for horses. After a winter of eating dry fodder, quickly changing onto fresh grass might cause colic symptoms, and can even lead to laminitis.

Potomac Horse Fever is confined to a small area of North America in the months from spring to autumn. But, it is enough of a problem that a vaccination is recommended if you are living or traveling through those areas.

Summer
Equine Influenza, Equine Viral Arteritis, and Equine Rhinopneumonitis mostly crop up in the summer months, mainly because horses are more likely to be traveling to shows and events. Both are viral diseases, passed between horses through the air, or from contact with a contaminated object like a feed bucket or bit. These diseases can crop of any time of year but are more likely in the summer.

Lyme Disease is becoming more common. During the cold months, ticks arenít active. But when things warm up, ticks are more likely to be lurking in the grass, weighting to latch onto unsuspecting wildlife, humans or pets.

Summer months mean mosquito-borne disease are more likely. This includes Eastern, Western and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis. Late summer is when West Nile Virus is more common. The mosquito that carries this virus is more active in late summer and early fall.

Rabies is another disease that can happen any time of year, but because wildlife that carries it may be moving around more during the warmer months, youíre more likely to hear about it summer.

Some animals go into semi-hibernation in the wintertime, which means they donít get around as much as they do in summer. This means areas that areas of hard winter donít have as much worry of seeing this in the cold months as compared to summer, when raccoons, and especially opossums are prowling about.

Anthrax poisoning is more common in the summer especially if there is drought.

Skin conditions that can be a problem in the summer are sweet itch, sunburn and allergic reactions.

Autumn
Again, early autumn is a common time for WNV to crop up. Itís also common for rain rot and sand cracks to flare up, especially if it becomes damp and cool.

Atypical Myopathy is also most likely to occur in the autumn. This is caused by horses eating the seeds of the sycamore tree.

When the weather turns frosty, the sugars in the grass change again, which can lead to colic and laminitis, just as lush grass can in the spring.

Horses that already have Cushing's Disease are more likely to get laminitis in the fall and winter.

Winter
Impaction colic is more common in the wintertime. Horses fed dry fodder that donít drink enough water, perhaps because itís unavailable or too chilly may have this digestive problem.

Strangles tends to be more prevalent in the winter when horses might be kept indoors in close quarters. This disease is very contagious and can go through barns like wildfire.

Equine Coronavirus is most common in foals, but in recent years it's been seen in horses over two years of age. It is most common from December through May.

Lice like to hide beneath warm winter blankets where it is dark and cozy in the winter months.
Horse News More In This Category:  Equine Disease and Prevention      Horse News More From This Author:  Saferaphus
 More News by Saferaphus
The First Horse Nations of North America
21st Feb 2018   |   Equine Disease and Prevention   |   Saferaphus
It wasnít long after the Spaniards arrived in what we now know as the Americas that the indigenous people who lived here began to see the value of the horses they brought. Whether they were gifts, captured strays or perhaps stolen ...
Winter Equestrian Games
19th Feb 2018   |   Equine Disease and Prevention   |   Saferaphus
The Winter Olympics are underway and thereís not much for an equestrian sports fan to get excited about. Maybe we need the alternate Winter Olympic events for horse owners to give us something to cheer about. You may have witnesse ...
Was Sure My Horse Had Colic
17th Feb 2018   |   Equine Disease and Prevention   |   Saferaphus
I let her out, and she strolled to the middle of the paddock, where she stopped and gave two cow kicks, then she pooped. Then she stood there, head down. I went from alarmed to really alarmed. I checked her pulse and nothing seeme ...
Winter Horse Water Needs
14th Feb 2018   |   Equine Disease and Prevention   |   Saferaphus
There is a lot of information online about how to make sure your horse gets enough water during the winter time. Some of it works, some does not. ...
Managing Equine Health Problems with Diet
12th Feb 2018   |   Equine Disease and Prevention   |   Saferaphus
A basic diet of hay or grass and water, along with a salt block is the standard for most horses. But, if your horse has a health problem, you may need to adjust what you feed to help treat or manage the disease. Here is a look at ...
Horse Ears and Hearing
11th Feb 2018   |   Equine Disease and Prevention   |   Saferaphus
Horses ears are large and open and funnel sound down into their ear canal. That big ear flap we see is called the pinna and is cartilage covered in skin and hair. They can move their ears separately, swiveling 180 degrees, listeni ...
When to Pay Up for Horse Stuff
7th Feb 2018   |   Equine Disease and Prevention   |   Saferaphus
Hoof clippers are one example. My last two pairs of hoof clippers came from the local farm supply store. They cost about the same as one hoof trim. Sounds like a good deal if I can do a DIY hoof trim, right? But those bargain hoo ...
Horse Racing on Lasix
5th Feb 2018   |   Equine Disease and Prevention   |   Saferaphus
Not all sports allow the use of Lasix, and the use of Lasix for racehorses on race day is not allowed in most places outside North America. Its use is controversial, even though horses that are put on Lasix perform much better tha ...
  View All News by Saferaphus
 
©2002 - 2018   PonyBox LLC Create Account Terms & Conditions Privacy Contact Us
378 Members Online 238,965 Registered Members 2,396 News Articles 9,791,464 Unique News Article Views 212,483,226 Website Views