Items

Forums
Introducing a New Horse to The Herd
 By Saferaphus   •   28th Jun 2017   •   283 views   •   0 comments


Bringing a new horse home is exciting for you. But it might be a bit too exciting for other horses that you already own. Just turning a new horse out with an existing Ďherdí is unlikely to result in nonchalance by the rest of them. They will certainly be curious, and they might feel threatened and regard the newcomer as an interloper. There will probably be some squealing, kicking and wheeling about at top speed. And, it can take several days before the new herd hierarchy is settled upon and everyone knows and respects their own place in the pecking order.

To prevent physical and mental stress on the horses, and mental stress on you, itís best to introduce a newcomer slowly. There are people who just put a newbie in with a pasture full of horses who been living together for some time. In some places, this is common practice. Most do it without too much trauma. If the horses have lots of room to maneuver in, lots of feed so there is no fighting over resources, and youíre willing to risk a horse injuring itself, you can probably get away with this.

But not everyone has a ten or twenty-acre field to turn horses out in, and in smaller paddocks, the chance that someone will get kicked, go sliding into a fence or get chased through the bale feeder increase. These things and many others tend to happen anyway, even without the catalyst of an exciting, but perhaps unwelcome herd member. And, it becomes more important to protect from injury if you donít want its coat marked up, or would like to lessen the possibility of it being lamed. And certainly, if it is old, very young, or itís mobility is compromised in any way, you will want to take extra care.

The slower, but less risky way of introducing a new horse to the herd is to let it, and the rest of the horses see each other, but not actually get close enough to physically engage. This on its own can be quite stimulating for some horses, and there will be lots of neighing and galloping around. Once everyone has settled down and got used to the looks of each other, you can put them in neighboring paddocks. Things will probably not escalate too much, although there is a chance someone will play or fight over the fence. So, itís wise To keep a close eye on how things proceed.

When everyone looks calm, the horses can all be turned out together. There will probably still be some scuffling as once they are truly together, the real sorting out of the pecking order will begin. It can take weeks sometimes for all the horses to reorganize their herd.

Going slow at first is also wise because it might help minimize injury, but itís also a good idea to make sure the newcomer isnít carrying any diseases or bugs. A few days of quarantine will ensure that things like colds, lice, strangles and other problems are kept isolated to one horse.
Horse News More In This Category:  General      Horse News More From This Author:  Saferaphus
 More News by Saferaphus
Why Does My Horse Stumble
24th Nov 2017   |   General   |   Saferaphus
We all stumble sometimes, and thatís perfectly normal. So it follows that our horses are going to take a misstep now and then. They have twice as many legs as we do after all. The occasional trip up isnít something to be worried a ...
Trotters and Pacers Racing Under Saddle
22nd Nov 2017   |   General   |   Saferaphus
Itís known as RUS or racing under saddle. In Europe, itís known as Montť racing or trot Montť. And in recent years, there have been a number of events held in North America, and associations formed for those who want to take part. ...
Donkey Facts
17th Nov 2017   |   General   |   Saferaphus
There are lots of donkey breeds, each with their own characteristics. Of the over 150 different breeds, we here in North America are probably most familiar with the American Mammoth Jack, often crossed with horses to produce a lar ...
Should Kids Ride Stallions
14th Nov 2017   |   General   |   Saferaphus
Should youth riders ride stallions? I think it depends on the situation. There are probably situations where it will work, and many where it definitely will not. ...
Horse Blanket Hazards
11th Nov 2017   |   General   |   Saferaphus
Most of us try our hardest to look after our horses well. That can include putting some sort of blanket on them to protect them from the elements. Unfortunately our best efforts can occasionally backfire, and the very thing that s ...
Horse DNA Testing
9th Nov 2017   |   General   |   Saferaphus
Up until the availability of DNA testing and a discovery of speed genes, breeding for the track has been a bit like a combination of gut feeling and practiced eye combined with mathematics. But now, DNA analysis can help breeders ...
City Horse Riding
6th Nov 2017   |   General   |   Saferaphus
Do you want to go riding? Do you think that you have to travel out to the countryside? Maybe not. Depending on where you live, you may be able to hop on the subway to get to a stable. Many cities have riding academies or stables w ...
Stolen Horse Tack Insurance Claim
4th Nov 2017   |   General   |   Saferaphus
We should all, at minimum have liability insurance on our horses. That way, if our horse causes injury to anyone, we are protected. Many of us also have insurance against the loss of our horse, and against the loss of our horse st ...
  View All News by Saferaphus
 
©2002 - 2017   PonyBox LLC Create Account Terms & Conditions Privacy Contact Us
379 Members Online 238,173 Registered Members 2,357 News Articles 9,567,721 Unique News Article Views 206,943,368 Website Views