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A Legend Retires - The Great Grated Cocount
 By mosquito   •   15th Aug 2010   •   7,154 views   •   3 comments
Whatever you think about rodeo, a great horse deserves to be remembered. A good bucking horse is a real athlete, and sometimes one comes along that is so spectacular that it captures the hearts of cowboys and non-rodeo fans alike. One of these horses is Grated Coconut, who was retired this year as the greatest bucking horse ever.


This horse was famous not just for his amazing performances in the rodeo arena but also for his puppy-dog temperament back at the ranch, and for his ability to sire horses just about as good as himself.

In the bucking horse world, good horses work hard. They travel the country, earn hundreds of thousands of dollars, and become as famous – maybe even more famous – than the cowboys who ride them. Both Grated Coconuts mother (Coconut Roll, a frequent Calgary Stampede champion and the high score ride in 2006) and his father (Wyatt Earp, 2-time Canadian bareback champion) were top class famous bucking champions themselves. When Grated Coconut was born, back in 1997, this little bay colt carried high hopes. But right from the start, there was concern about his attitude. Sure, even as a foal he would race around and buck just like his parents, but as soon as he saw he was watched he’d gallop up for a cuddle and a treat. Could this cute little bay colt be trained to buck like his parents, or would he grow up to be a big softie?

The Great Grated CocountWell, the answer was both. Some bucking horses are pretty independent, even aggressive. But Grated Coconut was an exception. Outside of the arena, he was as friendly as a child’s pony he could be led around by anyone and enjoyed the attention he got. But his owners – none other than the Calgary Stampede Company itself – needn’t have worried about his buck. Once the chute opens, no horse bucks like Grated Coconut.

Cowboys soon all wanted to ride this horse. His reputation spread across the country. Here was a horse that was just about unrideable not just because he had an explosive buck, but because he’d twist and turn in the air too. Here was a horse, that if you could ride him, you’d just about be guaranteed a win – maybe even a world record score. Best of all, this was a horse that wouldn’t come after you on the ground. Grated Coconut was a true professional. He didn’t have a mean streak he was a real gentleman until the gate opened, and once the rider was off the job was done. Here was a horse a cowboy on the ground didn’t have to run away from.

Here’s what some cowboys had to say about him:

“He’s the hardest bucking horse I’ve ever gotten on. He’ll do his part, so you just have to hang with him and match him jump for jump. That’s what makes him a champion. I’ve been riding horses for 20 years, and I still lay awake at night thinking about horses like Grated Coconut.”

“He is probably the most exciting and scariest horse I’ve ever been on…The thing about Grated Coconut was that even if you rode him, it was a battle all the way. He loved his job, always tried hard, and he’s one of the smartest animals I’ve been on. He always seemed to figure people out. He had a game plan before you did. He’s just a great horse.”

So how good was he? Six times world champion bucking horse, equaling the record of the great Descent back in the 60s and 70s. He was also six time Canadian Bucking Horse of the Year. Two cowboys set arena records of 91 point rides on him, and Davey Shields Jr. won the $50,000 first prize in the bareback at the 2005 Calgary Stampede when he rode him for a score of 95.

And even though Grated Coconut doesn’t compete anymore, he still travels around to visit the big rodeos as a celebrity guest, and his sons and daughters are ruling the arenas today. One year – 2007 – the six top buckers in the finals at the Calgary Stampede included Grated Coconut, three of his foals, and his half brother. Today he is valued at about $300,000 as a sire of the best bucking horses of the future. What’s he doing now? Grated Coconut is crossed with the very best bucking mares, and lives a life of luxury at Calgary Stampede ranch with their other horses, who mix rodeo work with vacations on 22,000 acres of pasture running loose in herds just as nature intended.
A Legend Retires - The Great Grated Cocount
A Legend Retires - The Great Grated Cocount
Horse News More In This Category:  Horse Stories      Horse News More From This Author:  mosquito
Dark Star  
That just proves, Rodeo horses don't have to be crazy
  18 days ago  •  3,902 views
 
ImaCoolCowgirl  
Fantastic article!! I don't follow rodeo very often and when I do its just the barrel racing...but I was very intrigued by this! Thanks so much for another great article!
  17 days ago  •  3,905 views
 
Sunset Riders  
Great Article!!! I love rodeo.
  17 days ago  •  3,924 views
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