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How to Make a Basic Graphic or Manip on GIMP
 By Dakodia Elite   •   26th Dec 2009   •   8,639 views   •   3 comments
In this tutorial I will tell you how to make a basic graphic/manip (whatever you wanna call it D) on the free program, GIMP. If you do not have GIMP, you can download it for free by going to http://www.gimp.org/.

First, you need to find some good stock images. Some very good stock sites are Deviantart, Morguefile, SXCU, and StockVault. Plus, our very own Ponylabs has many stock images for ponyboxers to use! The stock images that you are looking for are very clear and not blurry. But before you start going on an account for images that you just love and are going to use, you MUST read the owner's rules! MOST of the images on sites aren't stock. That is the most important rule in stock finding - owner's rules!

So, probably you picked out a horse. So, you need to first open up GIMP. After it's up and loaded, you need to open up your images. Do this by going to File - Open. Once you found both of your images, you may want to resize your horse image so it is not too big the the background. Do this by going to Image - Scale image. Then set your image size and then click Resize at the bottom.

On the horse image, click Edit - Copy. Then, changing to the background image, click Edit - Paste. The horse should appear on the background.

Then, on the toolbox, click the eraser tool. To cut around the horse more accuratly, zoom in by going to View - Zoom. I usually zoom in about 200%-400% so I can get a better view of the part that I'm working on. Select your brush size on the toolbox and then have a cutting frenzy! But keep in mind, you have to stay on the horse's outline or else if will look very...odd. (:

After you are finished, on the toolbox, click the Select By Color tool. Then, click anywhere on the image.

Now for the mane, tail and/or forelock. I use the smudging tool, but I know that different people have different ways of doing it. First, set your scale to 0.18. Then, change the rate to 80. The brushes I recommend for the hair are sizes 9-11, but for bigger or smaller strokes you'd want to use others. Smudge the hairs the way the wind is blowing, like if grass is blowing a certain way then the hairs should go that way also.

Now, for the hooves. If there is grass, you would want to smudge up, onto the horse's hooves. If there isn't, then you would want to either smudge or blur the bottoms of the horse's hooves, so the horse doesn't have FHS. (Floating Horse Syndrom xD)

Then, add your credits (where you got your stock images from. Example - Horse: Polar-Dreams.deviantart.com) and any other text you want on your image.

Anddd...you're done!
~Dako^^
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