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Rescue Me
 By ImaCoolCowgirl   •   4th Feb 2011   •   2,060 views   •   38 comments
Horse RescueI was in sorry shape. My ribs poked out beneath my dull shaggy coat. I was up to my fetlocks in my own manure. My mane and tail were knotty masses. My hooves badly needed trimmed. I had not seen my owner, much less a human, in more than three weeks. I survived only by drinking what fell into my bucket from a leaking drain spout.

Two weeks ago I heard a lot of crying, and a lot of whispering. But I never saw what anyone and no one ever came to feed me, or give me water. I peered through the bars into the stall next to me. Maze was looking worse. She was lying down and not moving much. I nickered softly trying to evoke a response. She gave a faint reply but it took more energy than I knew she had to spare.

Suddenly, I heard the familiar crunch of tires on the gravel and knew I had to do something. I whinnied with all my might, but it came out more like a loud scream. I tried again hoping to get someone to pay attention. I strained my ears to hear something...anything to signal someone had heard me. The swift beat of running feet neared the door. The latch clicked and the creak of the hinges signaled the large door swinging open. The bright sunlight assaulted my eyes; sunlight touched my face for the first time in weeks.

“Dad, Grandma’s horses, they’re still here!” a young voice called out.

“I know, Jess, I see them,” replied a man’s voice. “I’ll go get the vet and a trailer.”

I was too weak to move to the door, but I nickered softly. “Ohh, Black, how could we have forgot about you? And Maze you poor girl.” Jess cried softly. “Honey, you need to know she may not make it. We’ll try but I don’t know” said the man walking from the barn. The girl grabbed a brush from the tack room and slipped into Maze’s stall. She cradled the horse’s head in her lap as she gently untangled the mare’s forelock. “Oh, Maze and Black, I should have thought, I should have remembered about you guys. I’m so sorry.” Her tears wet the horse’s face. “Grandma died two weeks ago. Dad and I came today to start going through the house. I thought you had already been sold, maybe now I can convince Dad to let me keep you.”

I shuffled closer to the dividing bars. “I would give you water and food but I don’t know what the vet will want to do.” An hour later tires crunched on the stones alerting me to more people arriving. Two car doors slammed and a man’s voice said “this way-.” Two pairs of steps walked the path to the two—stall stable.

I turned to the older female voice. She looked at Maze and said to the man “I don’t think she’ll make it...I have the stuff to do it here.” Then she turned her gaze to me. “He looks like he’ll be all right after some work. Let’s get him on the trailer and take him to my place.”

My ears flicked Maze’s direction, I wasn’t leaving her here and they’d said nothing about taking her too. “Jess, you know these horses the best, can you lead Black to the trailer?” the man asked. “Sure, but what about Maze? How are we going to get her to the trailer?” Jess stepped from Maze’s stall. “She’s not going to make it. We’ll put her down here,” said the other female voice. “No, no, no! We have to try. I will not leave her here.” Jess glared viciously at the vet.

“Just get Black in the trailer, the back is open” her dad said gruffly.

The girl grabbed my leather halter with my golden name plate on the side. My owner always bought us the nicest things that money could buy, but now it just made my condition look shabbier. She slipped the halter over my ears and clipped the lead on the ring. I followed her slowly out of my stall. It was the first time I was able to stretch my legs in a very long time.

When I came parallel to Maze’s open stall I planted all four legs square and refused to move. I nickered softly at first; she raised her head and nickered back. Her eyes showed pain, but a certain determined light. I whinnied, urging her to try; I refused to acknowledge the intense pressure pulling on my halter. I whinnied louder, she snorted, grunted, and huffed but she dragged herself to her feet. Unsteady and barely standing, she took slow, uneven steps out of her stall to stand next to me. Maze rested her head on my withers and closed her eyes.

After she rested a few minutes I gave the shocked Jess a nudge toward the door. The girl took a few tentative steps with me right on her heals; Maze kept her head on my withers and followed us out the door. I hesitated about trying to get into the trailer. My legs were weak after the seemingly long walk and not being out in a long time. Maze and I closed our eyes and rested a brief while before attempting the step into the trailer. The floor of the open stock trailer was thick with sawdust. I touched Maze’s face and stepped in. Maze struggled to step up, but she made it. She lowered herself into the soft bed of sawdust with a groan. Her breathing was heavy but she was still alive and had made it. I lowered myself to the sawdust beside her. Jess shut the gate softly and bolted it shut.

I sighed happily enjoying the feel of the thick sawdust beneath me. I felt so relieved that we had been saved and Maze was coming with me. I am now ready to begin a new chapter in my life.
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