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Retraining a Racehorse - Moonfire (Week 1)
 By Polo the Weirdo   •   17th Jul 2010   •   18,223 views   •   74 comments
Retraining a Racehorse

Week 1:
I am going to type up, in detail, all my experiences with retraining Moonfire. I'm going to tell you what I did and when, what the results were, what my thoughts were, what Moonfire's progression is and so on. I hope to be publishing weekly articles on this, so I sincerely hope that you choose to follow them. My aim is to be able to offer some assistance, if just a framework or guideline for what to do when retraining a racehorse, for those who are facing similar training challenges. Of course, what works for one horse may not work for another, but I can give you some idea of what I did and what results it got from my lovely little pupil. If you have any questions about how I did a specific thing, or what you ought to do with a specific horse, please feel free to mail me, and I shall help in any way I can.

Friday 2 July:
For a while I have been talking to people and asking around about certain racehorses I would like to get my hands on. Eventually, I was able to get the details for a trainer looking to rehome a horse.

Next, I found out all I could about this horse from the trainer, to see if he would be suitable for what I wanted. I am looking for a junior or adult jumping horse, possibly with some dressage and eventing on the side. This horse's name is Moonfire. He is 16hh, which is about perfect for what I want, and 3 years old which means he should grow enough to be 100% perfect size-wise. At the age of 3 years, he is ready to start light work in just about any discipline. Admittedly, it would probably be better if he was 4, but thankfully is a strong enough horse that his age shouldn't prove a problem, especially since I shouldn't be too heavy for him when comparing my size to his. He is a gelding. Admittedly, I do prefer mares, but since I am planning on training him for resale, it is best to have a gelding, since there is far less market for mares.

Once I had my basic information, I grabbed my mouse and got to clicking around google, researching my new prospect. His sire, Dynasty, is rather an impressive racing stallion, but none of his progeny have done very well in what I'm looking at using him for. His dam, however, is sired by Elliodor, a stallion who has been known to produce some nice jumpers. My next step was to research Elliodor's progeny and see how they have done in the show ring. I found a couple of Elliodor horses jumping 1,20m and 1,30m, so that was enough evidence for me. I was also lucky enough to stumble across a forum discussion about Elliodor relatives and their uses in riding. It seemed that many people shared a similar opinion: The main traits that most of Elliodor's progeny show is a big, bold jump and a slightly nervous, skittish attitude. Well, for a resale horse the attitude could be a problem, but the big jump is exactly what I am looking for.

I have now established the fact that I am interested in seeing this horse. I contact the trainer once again, this time looking for more details. Moonfire has raced only around 6 times and he never did very well, so his legs ought to be sound. He did, however, suffer complications after being gelded and was given a 32-week rest. He last raced on 18 June 2010. Well, the rest can only do him good, but the gelding complications could mean his condition or health might be a little below average. Last thing to find out is the price and conditions of sale. Thankfully, the trainer was simply looking for a new home for Moonfire, so he said that I could have the horse free of charge as long as I took him as soon as possible and promised not to enter him in any races.

Now we list the pros and cons:

Pros:
Free horse. Ideal size. Good bloodlines. Short racing career. Gelding.

Cons:
Gelding complications. Possible skittish attitude. A little younger than ideal.

I decided that it was definitely worth going to see Moonfire.

Later that day, I went with my instructor and my mother to see Moonfire. It is always a good idea to get a few other opinions on a horse, especially from people who know horses. That way you can be more certain that you are not making a mistake. Well, Moonfire is certainly a large horse. Not only is he tall, but powerful and muscular, too. This would have slowed him down on the track, as he is a little too bulky, but it will be a great asset in the showjumping ring, or out on a cross-country course. His condition was much better than I expected, and he had a lovely temperament. He seemed sweet, affectionate and calm. Once we had looked him over in the stable, we took him out to have a better look. We examined his conformation, which was actually surprisingly good. He has the most gorgeous neck I've ever seen on a racer, good thick legs, and a wide chest that promises he will grow to be a big horse. His hindquarters need a little more condition and could do with some more muscle, but that is to be expected of a racer, as they move mostly off the forehand. We checked over his legs, and found a small bump on his left front knee, but it did not seem to trouble him and certainly was no more serious than a stable injury. We trotted him out to check his movement and soundness. He tossed his head around and bounced a little at first, but after that he moved nicely in-hand and seemed obedient. We concluded that he was sound, and his movement seemed nice enough. Overall, Moonfire was an even better horse than I had expected! I arranged with the trainer to come out early the next morning and test him under saddle.

Saturday 3 July:
I got up bright and early on Saturday morning to get to the racing stables at 8AM. I wore my cross-country skullcap as opposed to my usual jumping helmet on the trainer's recommendation as an extra safety precaution if something were to go wrong. My stirrup leathers happened to be attached to my dressage saddle, so I decided to try him in that.

I got on to Moonfire in a sand ring where they usually walk the racers as a warm up. He was already tacked up in his racing tack, so we just swapped his saddle for my dressage saddle before I began to ride him. The other horses were training on the track nearby, but Moonfire did not seem to be in the least bothered by this. He objected to the change in saddle, putting his ears back and giving a few sulky kicks, but this was to be expected, as he had never worn anything like it before. I walked him for a while to get a feel of him and to let him get used to the saddle. He was calm and relaxed and I could feel that he had a nice spring in his hind legs while walking. After a while, I tried trotting him. He would not accept the bit, but he responded beautifully to all hand aids and was even willing to bend a little. His trot is incredibly smooth, and I was easily able to sit to it. He has a long reach to his stride, yet he does not speed up at all. He settles into a nice, balanced rhythm and never shows any signs of wanting to bolt. I tried his canter as well, and found that he was a little lazy and reluctant on the transition, but that he had a big powerful stride, a steady rhythm, and good balance for a racer. Much better than I had expected. He was clueless about getting the left lead, but all racers always know only 1 lead when they come off the track. This is a problem that we will have to work on.

After my ride on Moonfire, I decided that he was not only worth getting, but an extremely lucky find! It was decided that I should pick him up at 9AM on Monday morning.

Retraining a Racehorse
Moonfire

Sunday 4 July:
No work with Moonfire.

Monday 5 July:
At approximately 9AM I went to collect Moonfire. We had to sign a few papers, but it did not take long, and pretty soon I was leading him toward the horsebox and the start of his new life. He was a little nervous about entering the strange box, but he went in after having a quick sniff around. I stood in the box with him for a while, keeping him calm and making sure he was well balanced, then I got out and left him to get used to being alone in the box. When we reached the farm I turned him out in our jumping arena and armed myself with a lunge whip so that I would be able to keep my loons away from the fence if they caused any trouble. Moony settled in very quickly and did not seem too concerned about the strange place or strange horses. Once he was calm and settled I attempted to loose jump him... That did not go well. He had no clue what to do, so eventually I decided it would be better just to find what would make him 'click' under saddle. So I got on him and rode him around, trotting and cantering over poles on the ground. He had a few moments where he didn't want to go over the poles, and then I would have to be quite strict with him and give him the occasional tap with the crop, which seemed to work quite well, since he stepped over without getting worked up. There was one pole he especially didn't like, so I got off and lead him over that one before getting on again and riding him over it. Once Moony was happy with the poles, I had a very low cross set up for him. He had no clue what to do, and did not even attempt to jump. After barely managing to get him to step over it a couple of times, I decided it was time to try a new method.

I took Moony on his first outride. He behaved absolutely beautifully! He stayed calm and obedient and didn't spook at anything. Since he was being so good, I decided to take him onto the tiny little jumping trail I often ride on my other horses, just to see if the different atmosphere would help him understand jumping better. Apparently it did. Moony soared over all the jumps, mostly consisting of twigs, yet some standing as high as 80cm or 90cm high. Moony kept a good rhythm and listened to me perfectly, so we were able to have a very enjoyable ride. After completing the track, I popped him over a little log jump at the top of the main trail to see how he would react to something a little more solid. At first he was hesitant, but soon I had him jumping it nicely. I found what helped a lot was to get into a light seat and drive him into a forward canter, then find a good rhythm so I could plan a nice stride to the fence, all the while being careful to keep a good, even hold on his mouth so I could force him over if he tried to pull out. Moony also seemed to like a lot of leg and very soft hands, so I just toyed with my riding style until I was doing what seemed to work best for him.

When I took him back home afterwards I pointed him at that same crossbar and he hopped over without a fuss. After that, I hosed him down and let him go. He rolled around in the sand at least half a dozen times, then got up and followed me around the paddock like a big puppy.

Retraining a Racehorse
Moony jumping a little log pile on his first outride

Retraining a Racehorse
Moony following like a puppy

Tuesday 6 July:
I got to the farm around midday and gave Moonfire a quick check-over, making sure that his legs didn't have any cuts, scrapes or swellings. He had a mild bite mark on his rump, but nothing too serious. Moony seemed a lot more eager to go today, and pranced around a little when I put his bridle on. Once tacked up, I took him into the arena to try and work on his schooling. We managed to establish a little bit of bend. I did this by opening my inside rein and applying a lot of pressure with my inside leg. Moony was a little unbalanced on the uneven ground (Our dressage arena is terrible.) so he seemed inclined to hang in on one side of the circle and hang out on the other. I reacted to correct it was best I could, tightening my outside rein to balance him and pressing with my outside leg when his shoulder fell out, and opening my inside rein slightly, holding my outside rein for balance and pressing hard with my inside leg when he fell out. He learned to move away from the leg very nicely and soon we were doing a reasonably smooth circle.

One he was doing that nicely, I worked on his canter. I attempted a couple of walk-to-canters and canter-to-walks on the right rein (his good rein.) which he performed surprisingly well for such a green horse. Once again I was shocked by the glorious power and smoothness of his stride, not to mention his wonderful balance and the unexpected adjustability he was giving me. I was able to lengthen, shorten, speed up and slow down his stride as I saw fit, and I was able to turn him very easily with just the lightest touch. Since his right canter is already so good, I didn't work on that for long, but instead set about tackling the left canter for the first time. I tried establishing a good bend and asking him to canter when I could feel his balance was in the right place, but he would always shift his weight onto the outside shoulder the moment I asked him, then strike off on the right lead. I tried pulling him onto a tiny circle to throw him off balance and encourage him to take the correct lead to right himself, but that didn't happen either. What I finally managed to do is get him to strike off to the right, then give him a sharp squeeze and have him change to the left. Well... At least I won't have to worry about teaching him flying changes... He responded to this quite well, and slowly started to understand what I wanted. Eventually, he struck off on the left lead on command. I made a huge fuss of him, and rode him in one circle, then took one full round of the arena in a light seat, patting his neck the whole way. Pleased with my result, I decided to call it a day for the schooling, and took him into the jumping ring. Again we started with poles on the ground, and this time he was not phased by them at all. I then tried some low crosses with him, and he did them without hesitance this time, though his jumps felt a little too effortless for my liking, so I decided to challenge him a little. I set up a 60cm upright and rode him at it. He hopped over sweetly, but left his hind legs trailing and clipped it down, obviously not respecting the poles enough. I put it up to 70cm and he cleared it once, then tapped it with the hind legs again. I then raised it to 80cm and rolled barrels under the jump to make it seem more solid. Moony did not like the barrels much, and he goggled at them and scuttled away. Next time I took him over at a trot. He got much too close and launched a big, awkward jump to get over while stretching his neck as far down as he could in fear of the barrels. So I decided to take the pole off and just jump the barrels on their own. That worked quite well. I toyed with his striding and tried to place him in different spots, and each time he cleared them nicely. After a while I put the pole back up and jumped it with him a few times. He was still finding awkward spots and jumping with an awkward shape, but as a green horse I didn't expect him to be perfect anyway. After doing that, I popped him over the crosses again, and his jump felt much better, as though he was actually getting into the air and not just cantering over.

Retraining a Racehorse
Moony jumping the barrels and pole

Wednesday 7 July:
No work with Moonfire.

Thursday 8 July:
I didn't have much time to work with him, so I decided to see what he thought of bareback riding. I buckled on his bridle and started by riding him around the lunge arena that he is currently being kept in (To keep him safe from the rest of the herd until they accept him and stop trying to peel him like a potato...). He did not seem to completely understand the concept of bareback riding, as he would take just a few strides, then stop again. Eventually I got him walking around without stopping, even bending a little, but he was still very hesitant and uncertain. I tried a bit of trotting, and he sulked a bit and broke gait often, so I decided I would take him out into an arena and work him properly. We went to our back arena, which is too thick for any real schooling or jumping work, but perfect for just riding around, stretching out, and building muscle. Moony seemed much happier now. He even cantered around nicely, seldom hesitating. I worked on adjusting his canter - speeding it up and slowing it down. This is clearly one of his strengths, for Moony has the most adjustable canter I've ever seen in a racer, hands down. He responded immediately every time I asked him to shorten or stretch forward, and we even managed to get a canter slower than a trot, yet with enough power that it did not break. After that I decided to work on his transitions a little, getting him to do trot-to-canter, walk-to-trot and walk-to-canter in the same corner on command, so that he could learn to distinguish between the slightly different aids and figure out that not everything simply means 'go faster' as it does in racing. He responded phenomenally! He picked it up really quickly, and by the end of our session we'd even had a few walk-to-canters without fitting in ANY trot strides whatsoever between! He also never cantered from walk when I asked him to trot, which was a great sign, as it meant he was really listening to me. We also tried some canter-to-trot and canter-to-walks, both of which he managed beautifully on command. The second I asked for a walk, he just dropped his canter and settled into a smooth walk, yet when I asked for trot, he did not even attempt to walk, but simply flowed forward into a trot. He really seems to have a knack for obedient transitions and stride adjustments, so I am beginning to think he has some potential as a dressage horse. I can also feel him starting to show signs of wanting to come on to the bit now, but I'm not going to push it. I'll just try to get some proper bend, get him stretched and supple, then ride him forward into my hands and see what happens. Overall, I am very pleased with Moony's progress, and he always seems a little more willing after each ride, so I think he is really starting to enjoy his new life.

Friday 9 July - Monday 12 July:
Away at an event - no work with Moony, though I did give him a hug when I came back on Sunday, and he was being very sweet. He seemed honestly happy to see me, what with the way he was nuzzling my hair and following me around. He really does have such a sweet personality, this Moony horse.

This concludes week 1 of retraining a racehorse - Moonfire. I hope that you found some of this useful, and that you will continue to follow these articles!
Fallen x Moon  
Thoroughbreds are bred to grow quickly, and while their bodies may fill out fast, their legs are still very vulnerable at a young age like three or four just any other horse. As far as Moony's long-term health goes, I honestly don't think that taking him over a few jumps to test his ability was horrendous as long as it isn't done often (and by not often I mean not often).

As far as injury concern goes though, he could very easily get splints as an immediate repercussion considering he was just raced a few weeks before you got him and he was going over jumps with no conditioning or experience (and therefore a not-so-good idea on how to carry himself). The thing that overall gets me is just how risky jumping him was!

I am thoroughly shocked that you were able to do this stuff with an off the track thoroughbred on his first rides you are extremely lucky both you and/or the horse didn't get hurt. OTTBS are a whole 'nother ball park and I don't recommend anyone try to repeat wh
  Jul 29, 2010  •  4,404 views
 
Fallen x Moon  
"Foxie, I think stating that if Moonfire pulls up lame later in life is because Polo jumped him too early is, well, wrong. You have no idea that her actions could be the cause of his becoming lame, if he even does ever pull up lame. There could be many other reasons for this possible future occurrence. We can't predict the future and making a statement like that is again wrong and a bit arrogant."

I know I'm not Foxie, but I just want to note that she does know what she's talking about, and this comment caught my attention because people really seem to lean toward this view. I do agree that if Moony turned up lame it surely wouldn't be from Polo jumping her on its own, but Polo doing so doesn't help anything. If someone gets shot in the foot, does it help them to shoot them again? No.

What you guys have to understand is this horse is not only a former racehorse, but his final race wasn't even a month before he started getting jumped. According to Polo it was on June 18th an
  Jul 29, 2010  •  4,404 views
 
Fallen x Moon  
"Foxie, I think stating that if Moonfire pulls up lame later in life is because Polo jumped him too early is, well, wrong. You have no idea that her actions could be the cause of his becoming lame, if he even does ever pull up lame. There could be many other reasons for this possible future occurrence. We can't predict the future and making a statement like that is again wrong and a bit arrogant."

I know I'm not Foxie, but I just want to note that she does know what she's talking about, and this comment caught my attention because people really seem to lean toward this view. I do agree that if Moony turned up lame it surely wouldn't be from Polo jumping her on its own, but Polo doing so doesn't help anything. If someone gets shot in the foot, does it help them to shoot them again? No.

What you guys have to understand is this horse is not only a former racehorse, but his final race wasn't even a month before he started getting jumped. According to Polo it was on June 18th an
  Jul 29, 2010  •  4,404 views
 
Fallen x Moon  
Thoroughbreds are bred to grow quickly, and while their bodies may fill out fast, their legs are still very vulnerable at a young age like three or four just any other horse. As far as Moony's long-term health goes, I honestly don't think that taking him over a few jumps to test his ability was horrendous as long as it isn't done often (and by not often I mean not often).
br
As far as injury concern goes though, he could very easily get splints as an immediate repercussion considering he was just raced a few weeks before you got him and he was going over jumps with no conditioning or experience (and therefore a not-so-good idea on how to carry himself). The thing that overall gets me is just how risky jumping him was!
br
I am thoroughly shocked that you were able to do this stuff with an off the track thoroughbred on his first rides you are extremely lucky both you and/or the horse didn't get hurt. OTTBS are a whole 'nother ball park and I don't recommend anyone try to repea
  Jul 29, 2010  •  4,404 views
 
PonyBox  MOD 
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  Jul 29, 2010  •  4,397 views
 
MoMoz  
Wow guys. So not cool. Polo has taken hours to type up this article and share this information with us, you guys should be greatful that she cares enough to share what she is doing. I bet you guys wouldn't like it is you wrote an article and everyone started saying it was stupid and irresponsible. I cannot believe how rude some of you guys are being. Just read the article, keep your comments to yourself if they aren't nice, and leave Polo alone. She is a great horseperson so stop doubting her abilities. And thank you those of you who are standing up for her!
  Jul 31, 2010  •  4,332 views
 
Velski  
You guys don't know Polo. For all you know, this could be the most succsesful way of training in history. Not cool, insulters, not cool.
  Aug 1, 2010  •  4,301 views
 
Fallen x Moon  
Critiquing and insulting are two very, very different things. Saying we're insulting Polo is like saying it's insulting to tell someone that they're pointing their gun the wrong way. Disasters happen all the time when people do things like this with OTTBs, just like when people point a gun at themselves and pull the trigger they're the ones who get hurt. Everyone who has spoken out against what Polo did has good reasons for doing so, they're not hating on Polo for no reason. In fact, they're not hating on Polo at all, they're just saying something that they feel needs to be addressed.

"How do you know this horse is underdeveloped!!!HOW!?!?For all you know this horse could have matured at age 2!!!"

Polo provided pictures for us. The second picture shows that the horse is very built on the fore, which is true for racehorses and Polo even stated this herself. Being heavy on the fore means the horse is not balanced, and is therefore underdeveloped on the hind so most of its str
  Aug 2, 2010  •  4,404 views
 
SouthrenBelle  
oh wow, great job with moonfire! (p.s. he's beautiful!)
  Aug 9, 2010  •  4,318 views
 
Polo the Weirdo  MOD 
Spoke to my vet:

He says that I must not PUSH Moony until age 5, but that there is no harm in jumping anything that is within his comfort zone. As such, in my vet's opinion, what I am doing with Moony is fine - as long as the horse feels comfortable and not overfaced, which he clearly does not. If anything, he seems bored with the heights I have been doing. :) I hope this helps to alleviate some of your worries. Thank you all very much! :D
  Aug 13, 2010  •  4,300 views
 
Dark Star  
Hey guys! Great article! and if it's letting her jump it, then I'm sure its a very good sane horse. We have jumped our 3 yr olds before in western saddles, of course the usually walked over the jumps....lol...its her horse im sure she knows what shes doing
  Aug 13, 2010  •  4,298 views
 
Inactive Member  
Thats great about the vet polo! Maybe that might stop people acting like they own moony, not you!
  Aug 19, 2010  •  4,325 views
 
Rein or Shine  
GORGEOUS horse! :) I envy you for having so many great pictures. :P I have GOT to get my mom to start photographing my rides...
  Oct 23, 2010  •  4,221 views
 
Madeirey  
Wow thats amazing!!!!!!!!!!! Kind of young to be jumping him that high though..........
  Oct 24, 2010  •  4,197 views
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